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Modern Istanbul

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Istanbul is most famous for ancient mosques and a starring role in world history, but there’s another side to it. One that most tourists never bother to see. It wasn’t until our last couple weeks in the city that we ventured into modern Istanbul. On the outskirts of the city center, new skyscrapers are springing up like weeds, and the focus is squarely on business.

Bomonti was an interesting neighborhood in which to begin our excursion into Istanbul’s modern side. Here, the human cost of rapid growth is readily apparent. Across the street from a brand new, luxurious development called the Anthill Apartments, there’s a collection of ramshackle dwellings. They might have been here first, but these are not exactly the kind of neighbors which the new, luxurious Bomonti desires, and the poor old homes are being swiftly removed.

It’s all rather depressing, so we were eager to leave Bomonti for the adjacent neighborhood of Sisli, where we sat down at a corner cafe and watched life in modern Istanbul whiz by. With gray concrete, busy shops and sharply-dressed people in a big, important hurry, we could have been on a street corner in any country… except, perhaps, for the giant posters of Atatürk draped across most of the neighborhood’s buildings.

After tea, we made our way to Kanyon, in the business district of Levent. This large mall, opened in 2006, was designed to resemble a canyon and the effect is pretty cool. The mall itself is upscale and pleasant… and though I find it hard to lavish praise on malls, I’ll say that, as far as malls go: not bad. We got a drink on the “canyon’s” floor, and took stock of those around us. Clean-cut businessmen and women typing into MacBooks or tapping on their phones. Not many beards, nor headscarves.

It was educative to see this very different side of Istanbul, but not an experience I would be likely to repeat or recommend. Jürgen enjoyed it for the photo opportunities which contrast so sharply with the city’s more well-known sights, but both of us were equally ready to get back to the ancient Istanbul we’ve come to know and love.

Locations on our Map: Anthill Apartments (Bomonti) | Kanyon

High Res Images Of Istanbul

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June 26, 2013 at 4:14 pm Comment (1)

The Sapphire Skyscraper in Levent

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Rocketing 780 feet into the air, the Sapphire building in the modern neighborhood of Levent is Turkey’s tallest building. A cafe on the top floor and an open air viewing platform on the roof offer one of Istanbul’s most breathtaking views.

Sapphire

Other than from an airplane window, I’d figured that it was impossible to see the entire length of the Bosphorus Strait — from the Black Sea in the north to the Sea of Marmara in the south. But from the top of the Sapphire, you can see the whole twenty miles. Going up to the roof costs about $10, but it’s money well-spent.

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Sapphire Tower Istanbul
Rolltreppe Sapphire
Speedy Elevator
Sapphire Viewing Platform
Mosques In Istanbul
360 View Istanbul
Bosphorus Bridge Istanbul
Overpopulation Istanbul
Traffic Istanbul
Traffic Jam Istanbul
Istanbul Streets
Public Transportation Istanbul
Bus Stop Istanbul
Istanbul Travel
Tunnel System Istanbul
Skyscrapers Istanbul
Istanbul Dense
Istanbul Park
Mosque In The City
Istanbul Mega City
Istanbul City Guide
Istanbul Stadium
Istanbul Financial District
Hochhäuser Istanbul
Bosphorus Strait Istanbul
Istanbul Suburbs
Kanyon Mall Istanbul
Construction Work Istanbul
The 7 Hills Of Istanbul
Modern Art Photography Istanbul
Street Jungle Istanbul
Broken Windows Istanbul
Romantic Get Away Istanbul
Censorship In Istanbul
Views Istanbul
Zig Zag Istanbul
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June 25, 2013 at 8:00 pm Comment (1)
Modern Istanbul Istanbul is most famous for ancient mosques and a starring role in world history, but there's another side to it. One that most tourists never bother to see. It wasn't until our last couple weeks in the city that we ventured into modern Istanbul. On the outskirts of the city center, new skyscrapers are springing up like weeds, and the focus is squarely on business.
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