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The Hans of the Grand Bazaar

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The Grand Bazaar is really a city unto itself. The main thoroughfares are where you’ll find the most popular shops and restaurants, but just like any city, the coolest spots are tucked away in its less-visited corners.

Silver Han

In days past, the hans of Istanbul functioned as inns; places for traveling merchants to rest and do business. Most frequently, the hans consisted of courtyards with a fountain for washing, and a kitchen or tea house. The Grand Bazaar, naturally, was a major hub for merchants, so it’s unsurprising to find so many hans within its walls.

Most hans were dedicated to a particular craft, and many still are. You can find gold-spinning in Astarcı Han, chains in Zincirli Han and silver merchants in Kalcilar Han. Wandering through the courtyards, you can find smiths practicing their craft… melting gold, for example, or hammering out a piece of copper. Happily, they seem to be accustomed to tourists, and don’t mind if you politely enter their shops for a quick photo. It’s great fun watching them at work, performing tasks that have been unchanged over the last few centuries.

Most of the hans are small and run-down, but many are lovely. The Zincirli Han, for example, is particularly photogenic, with all-pink shopfronts, a marble fountain and trees. And our favorite is the airy and comfortable Iç Cebeci Han, where you can dependably find guys sitting around in the sun drinking tea and playing backgammon.

If you stick to the main drags, a trip to the Grand Bazaar can be hectic and stressful. So make sure to duck off into the little pockets of relative tranquility offered by the hans, and check out some of the activities which have kept the Bazaar running for 500 years.

Great Resource: Self Guided Walking Tours Through Istanbul’s Hans

Pink Han Grand Bazaar
Turkish Crescent Han
The Third Man Istanbul
Han Copper Grand Bazaar
Workshop Hans Istanbul
Working In Istanbul
Old Hand Istanbul
Old Orient Lamps Istanbul
Worker Hans Istanbul Grand Bazaar
3 Little Dudes
Han Entrance
Sultan Hats Istanbul Grand Bazaar
Silver Shop Istanbul
Spinning Gold Istanbul
Copper Wire Spinning Istanbul Hans
Portraits Han
Dish Han Grand Bazzar
Grand Bazaar Tunnel
Secrets Istanbul
Tea Garden Han Grand Bazaar
Silver Decoration Grand Bazaar
Fountain Grand Bazaar
Smoking In Istanbul
Melting Work
Schmied Grand Bazaar
Melting Pot Istanbul
Black Smith Istanbul
Fungus Dome
The Hole Grail
Istanbul Portraits People 2013
Tunnel han Istanbul
Gold Han Istanbul Grand Bazaar
Shoe Maker Grand Bazaar
Carpet Strings Bazaar
Making a Carpet
String Ball
Looking Inside Istanbul
Green And Rost
Welding
Istanbul
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June 10, 2013 at 10:57 am Comments (10)

Lost in the Grand Bazaar

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With over three thousand stores and 61 streets, Istanbul’s Grand Bazaar is unlike any place I’ve ever been. It’s one of the world’s largest covered markets, and a visit is guaranteed to leave you exhilarated, frustrated and, above all, disoriented.

Main Entrance Grand Bazaar

In the Grand Bazaar, it’s not so much “whether” you become lost but “when”. The jam-packed streets curve confusingly and the shops all look the same. There’s no sky or sun to point the way, and the mad jumble of people, whether they’re shoving by or trying to win your business, will spin you around until you’ve lost your bearings. Enter a store, engage in a bit of haggling, spend too long admiring an oil lamp, and it’s already too late. Good luck trying to remember the direction you came from, or where you were going.

Immediately after the Conquest of Constantinople, the victorious Ottomans set about Turkifying their new capital. The Hippodrome was razed, churches became mosques, and the Grand Bazaar was established near the newly established university in Beyazit. Despite recurrent earthquakes and fires, the bazaar grew and thrived, and was soon famous across Europe as the Mecca of shopping.

Today, an estimated 400,000 people visit the market daily. Over 27,000 people are employed within its walls. The bazaar, in almost every meaningful sense of the word, is a city unto itself. There are restaurants, barbers, banks, a police station, even a mosque — everything a decent-sized town of nearly 30,000 might need to sustain itself.

Souvenir Shopping Grand Bazaar

We love the Grand Bazaar, and invent an excuse to dart inside anytime we find ourselves nearby. Of course, in the wrong mood, or on a Saturday when the number of visitors increases dramatically, it can be stressful. And though the great majority of vendors are respectful, a few are unbearably pushy. True bargains are very hard to find, if they exist at all; we found identical nargiles in nearby Tahtakale for less than half the price as in the Grand Bazaar. And if you’re not proficient in the art of haggling, you’ll leave with either empty hands or an empty wallet.

But somehow, none of that subtracts from the experience of visiting. You don’t have to buy anything to have fun, and we almost never entered the gates with the intention of shopping. We’d go to explore the hans, have lunch, watch gold-makers and silver-smiths ply their trades, and lose ourselves in the maze. Photo opportunities are everywhere, and many of the shopkeepers are happy to chat even if you’re clearly not planning on buying. We were once invited to try some çiğ köfte one guy’s wife had made for his lunch. And a carpet seller took us to the top floor of his shop for a view of the roof. Turkish people, in general, are friendly and welcoming to strangers, and this seems to be even more the case within the Grand Bazaar.

Location on our Istanbul Map

Rent An Apartment In Istanbul

James Bond Roof Grand Bazaar
Taking A Nap Grand Bazaar Istanbul
Stairs Grand Bazaar Roof
Dach Großer Bazaar Istanbul
Lost Grand Bazaar
Street Art Grand Bazaar Istanbul
Grand Bazaar Mood
Birds Eye View Grand Bazaar Istanbul
Old Par Grand Bazaar
Shop Owner Grand Bazaar Istanbul
Grand Bazaar Lamp
Arches Grand Bazaar
Mosque Inside Grand Bazaar
Grand Bazaar Ceiling
Main Street Grand Bazaar
Secrets Of The Grand Bazaar
Istanbul Grand Bazaar
Lamp Spiral Grand Bazaar Istanbul
Stores Inside the Grand Bazaar
Grand Bazaar Istanbul Souvenirs
Sindbad Shoes Istanbul
Weird Store Grand Bazaar
Old Watches Istanbul
Gold Inside The Grand Bazaar
Main Attraction Istanbul
Old Gramphone Store Grand Bazaar
Camel Oil Lamp
Hard At Work Istanbul
Zincirli Han Istanbul
Empty Street Grand Bazaar
Bargaining Grand Bazaar Istanbul
Carpet Store Grand Bazaar Isrtanbul
Carpet Seller Istanbul
Hand Bag Tree Istanbul
Secret Tiles Istanbul
Secret Tiles Istanbul
Old and New Minaret Istanbul Grand Bazaar
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June 9, 2013 at 8:37 am Comments (7)

The Spice Bazaar (or Egyptian Bazaar)

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Its real name might be the Egyptian Bazaar (Mısır Çarşısı), but the Spice Bazaar is how everyone refers to it, and gives a better indication of what to expect inside. Found next to the Yeni Camii near the Golden Horn, this ancient covered market dates from 1660 and is Istanbul’s second biggest bazaar.

Hazer-Baba-Istanbul

Although we found the shopping experience inside the bazaar stressful and monotonous, the building itself is wonderful. After the Ottomans conquered Egypt in 1517, they raised the funds to build this covered market by imposing heavy taxes on Cairo. For centuries afterward, the Egyptian Bazaar was the center of Istanbul’s spice trade, where handlers would truck in colorful herbs and seasonings from across the far-flung empire. The L-shaped building is a bit of a curiosity — there are six gates, but the main entrance is at the joint known as the “Prayer Field”. In this, the bazaar’s only wooden section, an officer would lead the merchants in morning prayer and remind them to trade fairly.

I hadn’t necessarily been anticipating turbaned merchants in the Spice Market, sitting atop piles of cinnamon and mirthfully counting out their golden coins, but perhaps something a little more genuine than the tourist trap it has become. There was still spice, and plenty of it, but every stand had the same selection and the same prices. The same hawkers perched outside, entreating you to examine their teas and aphrodisiacs. A lot of stands were dedicated wholly to souvenirs. It’s definitely not the place locals come to fill their spicing needs, and the inauthenticity ruins the experience.

Just outside, though, in the nook of the building’s L-shape, is a place where locals do shop: the outdoor Pet and Gardening Market, with hundreds of caged birds, fish, some dogs, and boxes full of clucking chicks. We enjoyed the atmosphere here a lot more than inside the Spice Market. One of the more interesting aspects was a row of Leech Doctors with buckets full of the blood suckers to be applied to feet or even the face. We had hoped to get a picture of the doctors plying their trade, but unfortunately, none of them had clients. And despite Jürgen’s pleading, I wasn’t about to sit down.

Location of the Spice Market on our Map

Great Hostels In Istanbul

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March 22, 2013 at 10:14 am Comments (4)
The Hans of the Grand Bazaar The Grand Bazaar is really a city unto itself. The main thoroughfares are where you'll find the most popular shops and restaurants, but just like any city, the coolest spots are tucked away in its less-visited corners.
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